• "Jelly Mind" by Gustavo Fernandes - Oil and acrylic on canvas, 1100 x 150cm
    "Jelly Mind" by Gustavo Fernandes - Oil and acrylic on canvas, 1100 x 150cm

    Plus One Gallery is delighted to announce that the forthcoming Summer Show 2016 will take place at our new gallery in Battersea Reach. 

    Private viewing Tuesday 19th July 6pm – 8pm
    20th July – 13th September 2016

  • Trafalgar House, Battersea Reach
    Trafalgar House, Battersea Reach

    Plus One Gallery are pleased to announce our move to new premises in Trafalgar House, Battersea Reach.

  • "Melt Water" - Oil on linen, 100 x 100cm
    "Melt Water" - Oil on linen, 100 x 100cm

    Quick Review
    Born: 1964, Falmouth North Yorkshire
    Studied: BA in Fine Art at Falmouth School of Art
    Work: Finnigans work is rooted in the idea of traditional realist/representational painting. His approach is to try and find vignettes of the world in which we live and try to portray what he has seen in a photorealist style.He is fascinated by photography and his work reflects that, often searching images which may have a slightly reflective or melancholic feel
    Publications: 2009 “Exactitude - Hyperrealism Today”
    2008- “American Art Collector Magazine”
    2008 – “Scarborough Realists Now” (Orage Press and Scarborough Art Gallery)

     

  • "Berries & Blue Cloth" - Oil on canvas, 97 x 146cm
    "Berries & Blue Cloth" - Oil on canvas, 97 x 146cm

    Born in Montevideo, Elena Molinari is best known for her still life paintings of fruit and vegetables, often placed in fruit bowls or alongside glass vases and silk cloths. Molinari works mostly with oil on canvas and is also renowned for her glossy, highly finished paintings of crumpled coca-cola cans. Since 1996, she has lived and worked in Spain, working as an Arts Professor at the University of Madrid. She has enjoyed success beyond Spain, both in her native Uruguay and in galleries across the world. We catch up with Molinari to discuss the inspiration behind her exquisite paintings.

     

     

  • Sweet temptation in Hyperrealism

    From ancient Roman depictions of lustrous fruit bowls to Andy Warhol's Campbell's Soup Cans, food has been a common theme in still life paintings for centuries. Many Hyperrealists have since developed this concept by painting modern foods and condiments in still life paintings.

  • "Lollipops" - Mixed media on paper, 59 x 74cm
    "Lollipops" - Mixed media on paper, 59 x 74cm

    Working in pastels, pencils and charcoal, Nourine Hammad uses materials rarely seen in hyperrealism. By approaching her subject matter honestly and without vanity, she strives to create detailed work that celebrates perfection and imperfection which coexist comfortably alongside each other. Her works are so excruciatingly simple and complex at the same time it’s hard to believe they’re not the real thing. We have a chat with Hammad about her unique artistic expression and process.

  • Roses Monet Sky - Ben Schonzeit
    Roses Monet Sky - Ben Schonzeit

    Artists have been seduced by the beauty and grace of the flower for centuries. Now, hyperrealists are refreshing the still life genre with contemporary methods of painting, invigorating the painting of flowers by challenging notions of tradition.

  • AB (Prayer) by Craig Wylie
    AB (Prayer) by Craig Wylie

    Quick Review

    Born: 1973, Zimbabwe, Africa

    Studied: Rhodes University, South Africa (BA Fine Art)

    Work: Wylie's work revolves principally around the search to extend the genres of still-life and figure painting.

    Publicatons: ‘21st Century Portraits’ by Andrew Graham Dixon.

    ‘Nature Morte: Contemporary Artists reinvigorate the Still Life

    Tradition’ by Michael Petry

  • Autumn Reflections by Christian Marsh
    Autumn Reflections by Christian Marsh

    We are pleased to announce that, after 12 years at our gallery in Pimlico Road, we are moving to larger and very modern premises alongside the River Thames, Trafalgar House Battersea Reach.

  • "B" by Andrew Holmes
    "B" by Andrew Holmes

    In a world where high-tech photography and instant photo messaging is available at our fingertips, what does hyperrealism give us that photography cannot?

  • Artist in Focus: Mike Briscoe

    Conflict between stillness and movement
    "Morning on the Promenade" - Oil on linen, 92 x 168cm
    "Morning on the Promenade" - Oil on linen, 92 x 168cm

    Quick Review
    Born: North Wales. 1960.
    Studied: Art at Wrexham College of Art and  graduated with a BA in Fine Art from Sheffield College of Art. 
    Work: In the past, Briscoe’s paintings revolved around his children and the beach near his home, however his most recent works focus more on time and place. His paintings are not an objective report on the natural world. They have heightened colour and lighting effect.
    Publications: ‘West Coast to East; a Corner of the World’ by Paul Collinson 

  • Pineapples by Antonio Castello
    Pineapples by Antonio Castello

    Natural foods such as fruit and vegetables often become the subject of hyperrealist art. Berries, citrus fruits and other varieties are put under a microscope and blown up to create monumental, bold and indulgent paintings that celebrate life.

  • Cherries and strawberries, Antonio Castello
    Cherries and strawberries, Antonio Castello

    Quick Review
    Born: Madrid, Spain. 1972.
    Work: Castello creates hyper realistic still life paintings which arrest fleeting moments, such as the decaying of fruit. His paintings hold a significant monumentality, close ups of grapes or piles of raspberries. He seamlessly blends a classical technique of painting with a modern photographic approach of framing and documenting.
    Publications: MEAM.  Museo Europeo de Arte Moderno. Barcelona

    Colección JAPS. México

    Fundación SCHLEGEL

    Colección Caja de Extremadura

    Colección Caja Castilla La Mancha

    Asamblea de Extremadura. Mérida

  • How To Eat Beans by Cynthia Poole
    How To Eat Beans by Cynthia Poole

    The Pop Art movement emerged in the mid-to-late-1950’s and was spearheaded by the likes of Andy Warhol, Roy Lichtenstein and Jasper Johns. Photorealism emerged from Pop Art, with the continuation of finding inspiration in everyday objects, scenes of commercial life and modern-day consumerism. We examine how hyperrealism is still influenced by Pop Art today.

  • GALLERY NEWS: We are relocating!

    Our temporary address will be:

    No. 24 Pimlico Rd, SW1W 8LJ

    Please note: due to the move the gallery will be closed Saturday 9th April.

  • Artist in Focus: Mike Francis

    Combining hyperrealism and commercial illustration
    Spot The Dog II by Mike Francis
    Spot The Dog II by Mike Francis

    Quick Review
    Born: London, England. 1938.
    Studied: Illustration at Central Saint Martin’s College of Art and Design in London, whilst training to become an illustrator Francis also pursued his own career as a painter.
    Work: Mike Francis is commonly described as a realist painter, using both in oil and acrylic on canvas. He is known for his glossy, highly finished pictures which often feature a prominent female figure accompanied by a dog.
    Publications: ‘Mike Francis at Messum’s’ in Art of England
    ‘Briefs Encountered – Mike Francis Work’ by John Swinfield
    ‘Francis’s tale of two cities: the West End, real and imagined’ by Jamie Welham

  • Artist in Focus: Christian Marsh

    Humane landscape hyperrealism
    China Town Cable Car, San Francisco by Christian Marsh
    China Town Cable Car, San Francisco by Christian Marsh

    Quick Review
    Born: Dudley, England. 1979.
    Work: Marsh's body of work consists of large scale paintings, which explore composite views of various cities around the world.
    Publications: “Exactitude - Hyperrealist Art Today”, by John Russell Taylor, ed. by Maggie Bollaert. 
    “An Alternative Viewpoint” in: WLVdialogue.
    “Photorealist Paintings: Art Exhibitions” by Stephen Albrow.

     

  • Transamerica Pyramid San Francisco by Christian Marsh
    Transamerica Pyramid San Francisco by Christian Marsh

    Urban hyperrealism takes both the modern metropolis and the mundane elements of city life as its subject. It challenges the artist to observe its diversity and understand the hidden meanings deeply rooted in city society. Here we look at how some of the biggest cities and most popular tourist destinations around the globe have been captured by hyperrealists.

  • Artist in Focus: Young-Sung Kim

    Challenging society's materialism
    Nothing, Life, Object by Young-Sung Kim
    Nothing, Life, Object by Young-Sung Kim

    Quick Review
    Born: 
    Seoul, South Korea, 1973.
    Work: 
    Young-Sung Kim produces hyperreal paintings of contrasting subject matters to illustrate the differences between the living and the material.

  • Artist in Focus: Cynthia Poole

    Examining consumerism with nostalgia
    Displaced Mints II by Cynthia Poole
    Displaced Mints II by Cynthia Poole

    Quick Review
    Born: 
    Bulawayo, Zimbabwe
    Work: 
    Striking and bold, many of Cynthia Poole’s paintings take food packaging, sweet wrappers and chocolate bars as their subject matter; often with a warm nostalgia for the 70s and 80s confectionery.

  • Mother's Day
  • Artist in Focus: Paul De Roy

    Exploring Forgotten Landscapes
    Retired by Paul De Roy
    Retired by Paul De Roy

    Quick Review
    Born: 
    Merksem, Belgium, 1951.
    Work: 
    De Roy’s body of work consists of  paintings and drawings, which explore Scandinavian landscapes and the traces of past inhabitants. Paul De Roy has been awarded 7 awards between 1984 – 1991 and is in a number of private and public collections.

  • Is there a place for artistic interpretation in hyperrealistic art?

    Hyperrealistic images achieve much praise, with the artist's incredible attention to detail and flawless techniques are frequently applauded. However, their extreme similarity to the images they mimic can beg the question – why not just take a photo?

  • Mr Fine by Andrew Holmes
    Mr Fine by Andrew Holmes

    In the hyperrealism genre of painting, capturing the complete essence of a photograph can lead to surprising details in the final piece. But what about those artist who use digital technology such as Photoshop before turning their photographs into paintings?

  • The Far Road by Paul Cadden. He maintains that hyperrealism is about more than representing reality in a new medium. It is, instead, about creating the illusion of a new reality - one that merges a believable, life-like appearance with emotional, social, cultural, and political themes.
    The Far Road by Paul Cadden. He maintains that hyperrealism is about more than representing reality in a new medium. It is, instead, about creating the illusion of a new reality - one that merges a believable, life-like appearance with emotional, social, cultural, and political themes.

    Photorealism and Hyperrealism often have their meanings confused outside of art circles. While both movements have their own individual stylistic features, each appears under the umbrella of contemporary art. So, what are the features of each and why is their difference important?

  • Indian Man by Jack Ede inspired by Steve McCurry's Holi Festival photography
    Indian Man by Jack Ede inspired by Steve McCurry's Holi Festival photography

    Social media has become an increasingly viable platform for art lovers. Artists are taking to the platform in swathes to exhibit their work and share their artistic process with the world. Here, we take a look at some of the best hyperrealists sharing their work on Instagram.

  • Waving Flags 1 by Diederick Kraaijeveld
    Waving Flags 1 by Diederick Kraaijeveld

    From salvaged wood to extraordinary street illusions, more and more different media are being incorproated into hyperrealist artwork as the genre evolves. 

  • London at Twelve by Kiki Meana
    London at Twelve by Kiki Meana

    Much like graffiti artists, hyperrealists are often influenced by their urban surroundings and look to evoke feelings of identity and sense of place within their work; though with very different results.

  • Hyperrealism has roots only as far back as the late 1960s to early 1970s, making it a relatively new art movement by most standards. However within the past 50 or so years, it has evolved into an astonishing and beautiful art style that captivates, intrigues and amazes many.

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